GIAN LORENZO BERNIN -THE RENNAISANCE 2016©  with detail of BERNINI'S Apollo and Daphne 1620= 23               Watercolor, Colored pencils ON PAPER 89.75” x 49.5” [227.965 cm x 125.73 cm]   

GIAN LORENZO BERNIN -THE RENNAISANCE 2016©  with detail of BERNINI'S Apollo and Daphne 1620=23             Watercolor, Colored pencils ON PAPER 89.75” x 49.5” [227.965 cm x 125.73 cm]   

  GIAN LORENZO BERNINI self-portrait 1623

GIAN LORENZO BERNINI self-portrait 1623

  APOLLO AND DAPHNE BY BERNINI 1623  PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN

APOLLO AND DAPHNE BY BERNINI 1623  PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN

Not only true to human anatomy, Bernini embodied human emotions into the subjects he created.  Daphne’s terror at being pursued by Apollo is integral to the astounding quality of Bernini’s talent.

The psycho-physical subtleties Bernini brought to his carvings at Galleria Borghese literally took Gary’s breath away.  Apollo’s lust and impassioned pursuit, Daphne's response of panic, terror and flight, brought Bernini’s marble sculpture  a human emotional dimension.  So much more than a  likeness, it was a living, breathing depiction from the inside out.  Gary realized he desired to create art that showed the inner humanity and not just the dimensions that depict the outer surface.

Experiencing Bernini’s self portrait, Gary learned how this artist approached skin texture and pigmentation with an emphasis on complementary colors.   This expanded Gary’s commitment to color as an indispensable part of the artist’s language and communication skills.

Gary's drawing expresses the Renaissance through color and realism, representing the rebirth  of humanism, scholarship and  beauty in the arts that followed the Middle Ages The high keyed coloration of Golkin's drawing is a reflection of the excitement as a result of living in Rome.  Continually  seeing the awesome and Baroque images and architecture of the Renaissance he felt obliged to communicate.  Gary lived in Rome, Italy 1968-69 & 2006