paolo uccello - oh no!  2017©  china markers, paint, color pencils ON PAPER   47" x 76"  [119.38 CM x 193.04" CM]      with PASSAGES from Paolo Uccello’s  The Battle of San Romano (Louvre version)  1455; plus a marble medallion floor  ornament by Uccello ; PAOLO UCCELLO -PORTRAIT provenance DEBATED 

 paolo uccello - oh no!  2017© china markers, paint, color pencils ON PAPER   47" x 76"  [119.38 CM x 193.04" CM]    with PASSAGES from Paolo Uccello’s  The Battle of San Romano (Louvre version)  1455; plus a marble medallion floor  ornament by Uccello ; PAOLO UCCELLO -PORTRAIT provenance DEBATED 

Influenced by Uccello, Golkin began to work on an abstract drawing about the attacks of September 11, 2001.  During the process of coloring different sections of the cartoon of the portrait of Jean Arp, a large abstract shape stood out that had no reference to the portrait.  Separating this form from its origin, Gary  saw a narrative message that inspired another painting. Scrutinized for months the image and meaning remained the same even though they had not altered from the shape found in the Arp drawing.   Like contemplating clouds, these abstract shapes are subjective and could have different implications for the viewer.

Paolo Uccello is acknowledged for his pioneering work with visual perspective to create distance and three dimensional space.  His best known works are three paintings of the Battle of  San Romano, Uccello exemplifying his understanding of perspective, color and pageantry to portray the glory and honor of war.  

This drawing concerns 9/11 as it  was experienced by Gary and his family from the roof of their SOHO loft.  As the first tower began to collapse, all the people on all the roofs, simultaneously shouted "OH NO!"  and raised their arms as if they could prevent the building from falling. The feather represents Gary's soul which remains intact although deeply traumatized and floating away.   Although not able to  imagine a worse tragedy, Gary imagined that fear would never be the same.  At the top of the drawing are two airplane shapes and the targeted towers.  There is a strong pink glow only on the abstract large shape visible from angles reflecting the loss of life. The dimensional star shape surrounding Uccello's portrait was derived from the large medallion by Uccello on the Sistine Chapel floor.

Visiting Uffizi Gallery in Florence  Gary first saw a Uccello battle scene.  Later that year at the Louvre in Paris, he saw another of Uccello’s paintings of the Battle of San Romano. These two experiences went right to Gary’s core loves;  the use of color and the drama of composition.

Note: the airplane shapes plus the larger abstract shapes were used unchanged as seen in the JEAN ARP 2016-17© drawing.

  paolo uccello   THE BATTLE OF SAN ROMANO 1455    louvre, paris

paolo uccello THE BATTLE OF SAN ROMANO 1455 louvre, paris

  PAOLO UCCELLO PORTRAIT - POVENANCE-DEBATED

PAOLO UCCELLO PORTRAIT - POVENANCE-DEBATED

 Marble floor inset attributed to Paolo Uccello 1425  sistine chapel, the vatican rome, italy

Marble floor inset attributed to Paolo Uccello 1425  sistine chapel, the vatican rome, italy